Advertisement

Responding to change in reproductive endocrinology fellowships

      Thirty years ago, in the days when I was a reproductive endocrinology fellow, the field looked far different than it does today. Reproductive endocrinologists at that time were most assuredly the experts in diagnosing and treating infertility, but were often, if not usually, the go-to doctors for patients with congenital uterovaginal anomalies, endometriosis, and those in need of complicated endoscopic procedures. The reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist (REI) was not only the authority on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and other hormonal problems, but often the leader in addressing clinical issues in contraception, abnormal uterine bleeding, and menopause. In the early to middle 1980s, infertility treatment, such as it was, was largely a surgical specialty. Many reproductive endocrinologists performed hundreds of operations per year, albeit with only modest success rates. There were fewer than ten IVF programs in the country when I began my fellowship, and intrauterine insemination (IUI) was a new and novel treatment. The educational priorities of REI fellows reflected the practice at the time. We were trained primarily in reproductive surgery, medical and pediatric endocrinology, and to a lesser extent the emerging field of assisted reproductive technology (ART).
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Reference

      1. American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Directory of fellowship programs in reproductive endocrinology and infertility; fellowships available in 2014. Available at: www.socrei.org/uploadedFiles/Affiliates/SOCREI/Fellowships/REIFellowshipPrograms.pdf. Last accessed May 5, 2014.

      Linked Article

      • Is it about business, education, or patient care?
        Fertility and SterilityVol. 101Issue 6
        • Preview
          There is an increasing trend in medicine toward subspecialization, and even further subspecialization of the subspecialty. When I started residency training, most urologists were generalists and practiced all areas of urology, including men and women, adults and children, as well as benign and malignant diseases. At that time, the only board certification was in urology. There were no subspecialty boards, even though some people focused on particular areas of urology. Today the field is quite different; there is subspecialty board certification in pediatric urology.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • The future of reproductive medical education
        Fertility and SterilityVol. 101Issue 6
        • Preview
          If creativity is the hammer by which technology progresses, specialization is certainly the nail. This journal and its burgeoning ways of communicating reproductive science and medicine is just one example of how successful we humans have become at documenting the “how to” for technology; and like every innovative pursuit that leads to such remarkable achievements as space flight and in vitro fertilization, the volume of background material necessary to master the current day's “how to” in order to build on it grows at an apparently exponential pace.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF