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Embryonic Aneuploidy Does Not Differ Amongst Major Ethnicities as Determined by Genotyping

  • J.M. Franasiak
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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  • M. Olcha
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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  • D.T. Taylor
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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  • N.R. Treff
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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  • R.T. Scott
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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      Ethnicity has been shown to be a factor in IVF success and differences in implantation, clinical, and ongoing pregnancies have been shown [1]. Aneuploidy is one of the best characterized barriers to ART success and, while ethnic background's link to single gene disorders is clearly established, little information exists regarding ethnicity and whole chromosome aneuploidy in IVF. With new methods of classifying continental ethnicity utilizing genetic profiles from a select group of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), termed ancestry informed of markers (AIMs), one can be determined with more accuracy than self-reporting [2]. The rates of aneuploidy in these patient populations have not been determined.
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