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Markers of Ovarian Reserve Do Not Differ Amongst Major Ethnicities as Determined by Genotyping

  • M. Olcha
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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  • J.M. Franasiak
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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  • D.T. Taylor
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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  • N.R. Treff
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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  • R.T. Scott
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, USA
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      The data on the relationship of ethnicity and markers of success in IVF have been limited and conflicting. Some suggest differences among ethnicities, others differences only in particular age groups, and some demonstrate no differences at all.1,2 Much of the literature is limited by small sample size, narrow ranges of ethnic backgrounds, and self-reporting of ethnicity, which can have a high non-concurrence rate compared with genetic ethnicity. Recently, genetic profiles created using a select group of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), termed ancestry informed of markers (AIMs), has clarified ethnic classification.3 The relationship between genetically determined ethnicity using a set of AIMs and markers of ovarian reserve in a large population has not yet been established.
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