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Embryos derived from surgically-extracted sperm are not at an increased risk of aneuploidy

  • R.L. Barnett
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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  • J.M. Franasiak
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
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  • R.T. Scott
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
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  • E.J. Forman
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

    Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
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      The introduction of ICSI has afforded males with severe oligospermia or azoospermia IVF success rates that are comparable to the general infertility population (1). For azoospermic males, surgical sperm extraction allows for ICSI where once donor sperm was the only option. Previous studies utilizing FISH suggested aneuploidy rates in embryos from couples requiring surgical sperm extraction are higher than the general infertility population. However, they are limited by sample size, the accuracy of FISH and a limited chromosomal analysis.
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