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In vitro fertilization in underweight women: focus on obstetric outcome

      Cutoff values for abnormal body weight, usually estimated by body mass index (BMI), have been established in medical practice to detect associated metabolic and endocrine alterations responsible for the increased risk of developing a range of health-impairing conditions among underweight and overweight individuals. According to recent statistics by the World Health Organization ( ), in developed societies excess body weight (overweight or obesity) constitutes an increasingly common status involving 50%–70% of the adult population. Being underweight is much less common, with a prevalence below 5%, and is thus less of a public health concern, generating significantly less research and publications. In addition, being underweight is frequently secondary to other conditions, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia, especially in the young population, and as such is often not considered a disease in itself but rather a feature of other diseases that require treatment. This situation is reflected in the field of human reproduction, and especially in assisted reproduction. Many studies clearly state the negative impact of excess body weight on spontaneous and assisted conception, in both men and women (
      • Sermondade N.
      • Huberlant S.
      • Bourhis-Lefebvre V.
      • Arbo E.
      • Gallot V.
      • Colombani M.
      • et al.
      Female obesity is negatively associated with live birth rate following IVF: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
      ), but few have focused exclusively on the underweight population and much less in men.
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      References

        • World Health Organization
        (Overweight and obesity/prevalence of underweight among adults, BMI <18, crude estimates by WHO region. Available at:)
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