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ATYPICAL CORE BODY TEMPERATURE PATTERNS AND THE WIDER IMPLICATIONS FOR CONDITIONS RELATED TO PREGNANCY, INFERTILITY, AND MISCARRIAGE RISK

      Objective

      To determine if pregnancy complications, ovulatory abnormalities and miscarriage risk were associated with atypical Patterns of vaginal core body temperature (CBT) measurements from the OvuSense (OS) system.

      Design

      Retrospective, longitudinal, comparative, observational study.

      Materials and Methods

      Participants used OS vaginally at night to monitor CBT when not menstruating. Three atypical CBT Patterns published previously, confirmed in updated Total Study Population (TSP) 20,067 ovulatory cycles from 8,177 OS users recorded March 2016 to March 2020: (A) “Crash To Baseline” = first nightly averaged CBT falls by >0.2 degrees Celsius (ºC) to lowest cycle CBT point (baseline), (B) “False Start” = rise of >0.1ºC did not result in ovulation but instead a return to baseline CBT followed by ovulation two or more days later in the cycle, (C) “Crash After Ovulation” = final CBT >0.2ºC lower than the post ovulatory peak CBT.
      A detailed medical questionnaire was then issued to study participants and the answers from 382 respondents accounting for 1,534 of the TSP cycles was used for further assessment. TSP used to confirm prevalence of cycle Patterns (A)-(C); and questionnaire assessed per respondent for each following historic ‘Diagnosis’:
      1. Any infertility related diagnosis
      2. PCOS
      3. PCOS and regular cycles
      4. Previous miscarriage = gravida >0, number miscarriages >0.
      5. Gestational Diabetes in any previous pregnancy
      6. Gestational Hypertension in any previous pregnancy
      Diagnostic Odds Ratio (OR) calculated as (w/x)/(y/z) for each Pattern + Diagnosis combination together with their Lower (LCI) and Upper (UCI) 95% Confidence Interval: w. Positive Diagnosis (+D), Pattern >1 cycle for respondent (+P); x. -D+P; y. +D-P; z. -D-P.

      Results

      Prevalence of Patterns: (A) 61.0%: 282 cycles in 172 respondents; (B) 66.3%: 205 cycles in 136 respondents; (C) 59.8%: 229 cycles in 137 respondents
      Tabled 1
      PatternABC
      DiagnosisLCIORUCILCIORUCILCIORUCI
      Any infertility diagnosis0.961.432.151.481.722.650.881.091.67
      PCOS1.191.792.691.832.804.291.031.572.39
      PCOS + Regular Cycles1.001.763.110.791.142.510.851.512.69
      Previous Miscarriage3.525.9410.033.826.8412.253.806.8812.46
      Gestational Diabetes0.692.156.680.260.852.810.070.341.54
      Gestational Hypertension0.571.503.970.180.581.810.110.391.39

      Conclusions

      Results confirm previous research [1] that atypical CBT Patterns may aid infertility diagnosis, and elevated risk of miscarriage. Pattern A. may also provide a warning for elevated risk of pregnancy issues. It should be noted that the absence of an existing Diagnosis does not necessarily render the results with positive Patterns “false”, and the existence of a Pattern could anyway indicate investigation for ovulatory abnormalities.

      References

      1. Karoshi M, Hurst B (2020) Atypical Temperature Patterns as an Aid to Identify Infertility Issues and Miscarriage Risk. P-628 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 36th Annual Meeting.
      2. Hurst BS, Pirrie A (2019) Atypical vaginal temperature patterns may identify subtle not yet recognised causes of infertility P-345 American Society for Reproductive Medicine 75th Annual conference. Fertility and Sterility - September 2019 Volume 112, Issue 3, Supplement, Pages e244–e245
      3. Papaioannou S, Delkos D, Pardey J (2014) Vaginal core body temperature assessment identifies pre-ovulatory body temperature rise and detects ovulation in advance of ultrasound folliculometry. European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 30th Annual Conference.